Research Roundup (Fall ’14, Week 1)


Every week our Research Editors highlight a few of the latest headlines in science news and explain why these pieces are interesting and applicable to our classes at UC San Diego. If you find an engaging science article, share it with us on our Facebook page and your highlight may just be featured!
Could Multiple Sclerosis Begin in the Gut? | Scientific American

Researchers are looking into the possibility that a person’s gastrointestinal tract microbiome may contribute to the disease multiple sclerosis (MS). The majority of the human immune system is in the gut, and the microorganisms that reside in there help regulate immune response. It is believed that a disruption in this microbiome contributes to the development of MS. However, scientists think that this is merely one factor, and that genetics and environment also contribute.

If you are interested in diseases, consider taking Immunology (BICD 140).

– Jasmine Chau | Sr. Research Editor

Misfolded Proteins Travel in Huntington’s Disease | Scientific American

Huntington’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that causes loss of muscle control and cognitive deterioration. Scientists believe that the spread of misfolded proteins in the brain may cause the disease to progress into later stages. Blocking the spread of misfolded proteins may be the key to slowing progression of the disease and delaying the onset of symptoms.

If you are interested in diseases, consider taking Immunology (BICD 140).

– Jasmine Chau | Sr. Research Editor

Drug-infused nanoparticle is right for sore eyes | Science Daily

For the millions of people who suffer from dry eyes, eye drops are considered an absolute necessity. The drops are applied 2-3 times a day to ease painful conditions and allow users to carry on with their days. Researchers have now developed a topical solution containing nanoparticles that will cure dry eyes with only one application per week!

If you are interested in drug function and metabolism, consider taking Pharmacology (BIMM 118).

– Neil Srinivas | Jr. Research Editor

‘Achilles heel’ in metabolic pathway identified, could lead to new treatments for lung cancer | Science Daily

Researchers have discovered an “achilles heel” in a pathway used by lung cancer cells to rapidly divide. The activation of the PPARγ (peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor gamma) causes a crucial change in lung cancer cells that hinders them from dividing. It is known that the metabolism of cancer cells greatly differs from that of normal cells. The possibility of changing the metabolism of cancer cells in a manner detrimental to them may allow for the development of new forms of cancer treatment.

If you are interested in learning about the metabolism of cancer cells, consider taking Biology of Cancer (BIMM 134).

– Neil Srinivas | Jr. Research Editor

 



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